Sarah Peschell Studios

Want to see the whole piece I submitted for the Anonymous Art Show? 

It is called "Lost in Flight" and is 12" x 12" on a wooden cradled panel.



This piece is still in my possesion. Sadly, it did not sell during the show. Even more sad is that it did not make it through both jury processes to be shown. Because of my decision to leave a small piece of chain hanging down off the bottom of the piece, it was rejected. Mainly for practical hanging and positioning considerations in this case as the chain limited where it could be hung so as to not interfere with another piece. 

On the bright side, I have made a new art piece which has not happened for awhile. And it is still available for purchase! 


In the piece I created for the International Artists Day Anonymous Art show, I used a particularly interesting found object, at least I think so. It was two pieces of semi-spherical turquoise glass. They were given to me by my sister, an aircraft mechanic. Naturally, I was curious as to what these pieces were from, so I went back and asked. It turns out that they are pieces of a wingtip position light lens!

Now, my art piece had a turquoise colour theme to it and these glass pieces fit right into that beautifully. However, that brought up another question. From my knowledge of aircraft, one wingtip light (the right or starboard) is always green. My light cover looked turquoise, how did that fit? After a bit of research I discovered that the green is called 'aviation green' and it is a colour like a traffic light that is easily distinguishable from a distance. Also, as far as I can gather, the turquoise lens cover is used with a yellowish incandescent bulb, making it appear alot more green when lit.

Who knew? 




 I  am so  excited!

I’ve  been  accepted  as  an  artist  into  the  100  Braid  St  Studios  &  Gallery  Anonymous  Art  Show @iadanonymous_artshow. I created 1 piece of  art  for  the  show  and  hope  that  you  will  attend  the  Gala Opening  Night  on  International  Artist  Day, Thursday, October  25  from  6:30-10pm. . Tickets  are  $35  per  person  and  you'll  have  from  6:30-7:00  to  wander  around  and  look  at  the  art  &  decide  which ones  you'd  like  to  purchase. It's  a  mystery  as  all  of  the  pieces  are  unsigned  but  I'll  be  giving  sneak  peeks  of  the  art I created.  It's  a  treasure  hunt  for  you  to  find  my  work  and  when  the  bell  rings  at  7:00  the  buying  can  begin!   

 If  you  can’t  make  the  Gala &  get  first  pick  of  my  art  there  are  open  studio  viewing  hours  on  Friday  October  26- Sunday, October 28 from  10am-5pm. This  is  a free  event  but  you  risk  missing  out  on  being able  to  purchase  my  art. 


I'm back at it again. Just beginning to get back into making art. Today, and for now I've started with simply working on paper with pencils. Portable,  compact and easy cleanup. 

Art making requires lots of energy and focus. I love getting lost in my work, losing track of time and place. Sadly, though, by the end of a day I just don't have that much energy to give it. Often, instead of making art I will fulfill the need to create with something less all consuming. Still scratching the creative itch, just not creating original artworks. 






Claude Monet Londres. Le Parlement. Reflets sur la Tamise, 1905 oil on canvas

Today, we went to see the Claude Monet Secret Garden show at the Vancouver Art Gallery (with a toddler and baby- not the most leisurely viewing experience). I was very excited to see this show. It is so different seeing the paintings in person instead on the pages of an art history textbook. I enjoyed the show and would recommend going to see it (obviously- he's one of 'the Masters'!)

One of the things that stood out to me was, not a particular painting, but what one of the explanation boards said about Monet and his drive to paint towards the end of his life. It explained that Monet began to go blind later in life and he lost the majority of his colour perception which was so critical to his work, causing him great frustration. However, Monet was determined to paint, even if he had to paint blind just as Mozart composed music deaf. Even though he was so frustrated and faced great obsticles to painting, even though he was tempted to give up, he kept painting. He found ways to keep going. He relied on his inner artistic vision and produced numerous works that are still valuable to us and our understanding of painting today.

How much poorer would we be had he not perservered?

And here I am, facing far less debilitating obsticles and I have not perservered. I have let my art hibernate, neglected, with only a few wishful sighs directed at it.

I have come away from the exhibition with these thoughts ringing in my head and I am chastised for my neglect of my artwork as well as reminded to keep going.

 


Just about everybody seems to have memories of summer roadtrips from childhood. I do. We drove from here (Vancouver) to central Alberta pretty much every year. Up, over and through the mountians. Did you know that depending which way you drive, you cross 4 or 5 mountian ranges? In my books that's alot of mountian in a pretty short distance.

So this summer we perpetuated the tradition and did our first roadtrip as a family. We split the drive into 2 days, which made for a much more liesurely pace. Everytime we drive through the mountians I marvel at them. Their beauty, their magnitude, their variety amazes me again and again. I haven't gotten tired of seeing them yet. This time I also got to see some new vistas. Because we took longer on the drive, we could detour and so we stopped to hike in a couple spots.


Bridal Veil Falls, BC


The view from the veranda of our B&B in Revelstoke, BC


Johnston Canyon, Banff National Park


Lake Morriane, Banff National Park


Three Valley Gap, BC

There you go, just a couple highlights from our trip, and now we are back into our normal routine. More musings from artmaking coming soon.


Our family has begun to make it a habit to go for a picnic in a park on Sunday afternoons while we have gorgeous summer weather. This weekend we chose Queen Elizabeth Park, home to some stunning views. It is the highest point in the city of Vancouver, just a quick fact. We finished off our evening with a stop at Earnest Ice Cream, always yummy. Here are a couple photos of things that caught my interest along the way. 











I've been working a new piece that I think is almost complete. I thought I would show you a few pictures of it in process.

In the beginning there was just a pile of interesting bits and bobs, things that seemed to go together to form a collection. In this case all the elements were wooden. I had one piece that I really liked the aged, weathered appearance it had. In contrast, some of the other pieces, while they had interesting shapes were stark, fresh wood. Doing some manual aging of a few pieces was the next step in the process before even figuring out the composition. Then came arranging, adding layers and rearranging everything until I was satisfied. But it still seemed like something was missing, I couldn't quite make the last pieces I had work to finish it. Then, this morning I was adding some lettering and letting my mind wander as I applied glue, it occured to me to take the words literally and step out of the wooden box for the finishing touch. And so, one clock face was added, and viola, it was just the right thing!

A final photo is coming, but right now the glue is drying.


My starting pile of bits and bobs.


The aging process and contemplation stage.


Adding the finishing touch.


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